Let’s Get HAMR’D!

We have some big plans for 2018.

Van building, random travel, polebarn erecting, and lotsa fishing.

One thing that has been added to that list is racing, lotsa racing. Now, I’m no racer boy. Yes, I wear spandex and I like to go fast, but no one would call what I do racing. That being said I am signing up to race in 2018 because I need it. It’s also going to allow Chelsea and I to run around a bunch. Chelsea is even planning on doing a few running races.

I’ll put a list of races and places in a future post. Of all my planned races I’m most stoked for the HAMR. Why is the stoke so high? Click this link and you’ll see why.

HAMR

Maybe the HAMR is an adventure race.

Maybe the HAMR is a bike race.

Maybe the HAMR is a sadistic spin through the north woods.

Who friggin’ knows…

All I know is that I’ll be anxiously tucked into my sleeping bag waiting for what I can only hope will be a black metal wake up call at Forestville. May the woods be filled with shreddy guitar solos before we all pedal into the darkness.

I hope I don’t get nailed… Let’s HAMR.

-J

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Day 5: East Ho!

Day 5 was supposed to strictly be a travel day; point it east and go as far as possible. But on our way out of the campground the distractions started. We followed the signs to Cape Meares. We weren’t quite sure what it was but deep down we really weren’t ready to leave the coastal region and would do anything to prolong the inevitable so we took a segue to Cape Meares.

Cape Meares park has a cool little lighthouse, excellent views, and the most unique Sitka Spruce called the Octopus Tree.


After Cape Meares we started a slow trek toward Portland through the Tillamook state forest. On the way through we stopped at a few waterfalls and even tried to take a ridiculously skinny mountain road… needless to say we had a super sketchy turnaround. Ultimately, we made it to Trader Joe’s and REI to restock then navigated a weird Siri-route to get to Justin’s for the box we shipped out.

Prior to the Eagle Creek Fire we had planned to stay in that area a few nights. The rivers, waterfalls, and hiking in this area are second to none. Above all else we wanted to see Multnomah Falls. Unfortunately due to the actions of a 15 year old boy who has yet to be named we were robbed of those experiences. A few weeks before our visit said 15 year old was seen tossing fireworks into the gorge which lead to the Eagle Creek Fire. While the fire is still technically burning it’s estimated that the fire devoured over 48,000 acres. The resulting scars on the landscape will forever change the gorge. The drive through the gorge was still pretty, it was just another reminder how awful people are. Very sobering.

We camped at the Deschutes River Recreation Area where it dumps into the Columbia River. The campground was right on the riverbank and the facilities were very clean. We ate Annie’s ravioli, drank PNW IPA, played our new National Parks Trivia game, and slept hard.

This is how every travel day should end.

-J&C

Day 4: Tillamook Rambling

Day 4 we awoke quite warm thanks to an extra blanket. Have I mentioned how much I look forward to insulation in Vinny?

Our destination de jour was Tillamook and I wanted to have coffee with a little view so we secured the load and started driving. We pulled off the road just as first light made an appearance and brewed up some coffee while overlooking Nehalem Bay. For some reason I couldn’t stop thinking about shellfish and mollusk gathering in that bay. It was actually like a little mini obsession while we were in that area. I almost bought a book on harvesting. Truth be told, I didn’t eve want to eat them I just wanted to see some. I digress.

We spent most of the morning checking out roadside pull-offs. Each one was quite pretty, but didn’t really hold a candle to what we had seen in the previous two days.

Just north of Tillamook we saw a sign for Kilchis Point Reserve. It appeared to be a small park/nature reserve offering a trail to some wildlife viewing on the bay. The reserve had a beautifully built trail system with many informative plaques along the route. It was raining pretty hard so we did not read them all. There is one in particular that I was very happy to have read: reptiles of Kilchis Point. It showed three slimy little animals. I though that it was just a cool sign covering creatures that in theory could live at the reserve. I never thought that we would see any of them. That is until the rain brought out the newts. They were all over the trail.

 

 


When we were in grad school Chelsea and I worked for a family that we will forever call “the most extraordinaire people that we have ever met.” He owned and operated a large car company and she was a movie star. His father had patents on many automobile parts, and her family were some of the settlers of Portland. Long way to say that Tillamook Cheese has special meaning to us now following Her indoctrination. Therefore, we made it a point to make a pilgrimage to the Tillamook Co-op. Tillamook is a very unique area in Oregon. It’s a group of lush plains areas with rich soil nestled between the Pacific Ocean and Oregon’s coastal mountain range. A series of rivers run through the plains and feed into Tillamook Bay. Between the rivers many groups of very happy cows make some of the best dairy. Driving south you just kind of pop out of the mountains into this beautiful hamlet.

When we got to the visitor center we found out that we would not be able to take a company tour because they are hard at work erecting a new super visitor center to be opened Spring 2018. I guess we will have to make a return trip next year… The temporary center did not disappoint. It has historical information regarding the creation of the farmer’s co-op and also information on the cheesemaking process and cows. Most importantly the visitors center has cheese samples, cheese for sale, and many many many different grilled cheese sandwiches!

 


We learned, laughed, shopped around, and ate a lot of cheese. Of course we stocked up on cheese for the return trip.


With full bellies and our fill of human interaction for the day we took to the woods. First stop: Munson Falls. While sailing down PCH we saw a very small sign pointing us toward Munson Falls. We knew that we wanted to check Munson out from our reading in An Explorer’s Guide to Oregon. The book said that this is 319 foot waterfall is the largest in the coastal range so the unassuming roadside sign made me second guess the book’s glowing review of Munson. I am very glad that we trusted the book.


Caption: It’s hard to believe that the fields we drove through to get to the falls would abut this lush old growth. Vinny seemed to really like it.


As the rainy morning moved on a sunny afternoon layed itself out in front of us. Up to this point we had had a pretty full day: beaches, newts, cheese, and waterfalls. We were ready to find a place to bed down. Unfortunately, we just kept finding cool things to do. As we turned toward the ocean we left the cows and pastures and started to climb. We kept going up until a surprisingly nice parking lot appeared. The parking lot was for the Cape Lookout trails. Without any internet connection we had no clue what to expect. We could hike to the beach (way the heck down there); take the Cape Lookout Point Trail; or hike to the campground. The posted trails map looked promising and we knew that we were quite high up so we picked the Cape Lookout Point Trail and started out.


This bench cut trail heads west from the parking lot through a stand of towering Sitka Spruce. As you continue down the trail the ground quickly disappears to your left but the trees remain. It switches back and forth along the Cape Lookout point. We didn’t make it to the end of the trail due to some very slippery conditions. However, the views along the way were stunning.

 


The trail is well maintained and is a must if you are in the area. Next time we come out we plan to make it to the end.


When we finally did bed down we found ourselves at the Cape Lookout State Park Campground where the campsites are essentially on the beach. The view out the backdoor was nothing to scoff at.

Because we were in the off season it was almost completely empty. We camped near the bathrooms and the beach entrance. Another windy rainy night in the van on the beach. Things could be much worse than this right?

-J&C

Day 3: Ecola and Cannon Beach

We woke up in Vinny, the Uninsulated, a bit chilled but dry. The rain was a constant reminder that we made the right decision in not tent camping during the trip. Once Vinny gets insulation and a heat source it will be much more pleasant. Regardless, we were happy to be able to make coffee inside and plan out our day. Breakfast was delicious Tillamook marionberry yogurt.

Our loose plan was to explore more of Ecola State Park; find a brewery; and take some time to slow down a little.

Ecola State Park is much much more than a $5 spot to drive out and snap pics of sea stacks. Turns out that it has some serious hiking trails, the beautiful Indian Beach, cougars, and even sharks! In the interest of getting the most bang for our time (a common theme of this whirlwind tour of everywhere, as you will see) we chose Indian Beach as the spot for mobile basecamp. This meant another slow but beautiful trip down the freshly paved road through Ecola. We snaked through the Sitka Spruce and Western Hemlock until we finally descended onto Indian Beach.


I love a good beach as much as the next guy but Indian Beach is much more than a pretty spot to take pictures. The beach’s makeup including sea stacks, cliffs, and large boulder piles lead to a diverse tidal zone.

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We made it to the beach as the tide was going out which allowed us to see a diverse array 22792314_10109211856128293_2300970124385076768_oof invertebrates. As a child I remember going to beaches in Florida and being absolutely obsessed with anemones and shellfish. I am very happy to report that that childhood sense of wonder has not been beaten out of me! Without disturbing the wildlife, we were able to observe sand fleas, anemones, tiny crabs, barnacles, and a variety of other sea life along the rocks and pools.

Side note: Investing in a fully waterproof case proved invaluable on this trip, not just for the rainy weather, but also in capturing underwater pictures such as these!

These photos were taken with an iPhone 7 protected by a Lifeproof case. Highly recommend.

 

 

We had the beach to ourselves for the most part and spent a few hours soaking up the views, hiking up and down the coast, and exploring the tidal pools.

Before leaving our little haven we made coffee using these yet-to-be-released single use pour over brewing gadgets that are simple to use and taste great. I cannot wait to tell you more about these later.

 

The morning’s excitement stirred up quite a hunger. We read great things about Public Coast in Cannon Beach so we headed down. Unfortunately we didn’t know that they were closed for brewing on Wednesday.

Luckily, Pelican Brewing was open, so we stopped in for lunch. We had the fish and chips along with some smoked salmon dip. The vibe of the place was pretty touristy, yet the food was great and there were a few other things we wanted to try. The beer was OK but a little on the watery side. Definitely not what I expect from a PNW brewery, but then again, us Michiganders are pretty spoiled by our local craft brews.

After lunch we walked to the main natural attraction of Cannon Beach: Haystack Rock. This impressive sea stack/mound can be walked to during low tide. It plays host to many intertidal animals and serves as a nesting ground for many different waterfowl.

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I’m sure that Cannon Beach is bustling with tourists during the busy season. However, our visit was mid-fall in the middle of the week and it was quiet and quaint. We popped in and out of art shops, bookstores, and spent some time at the Cannon Beach Chocolate Cafe (Chelsea’s favorite find–try the dark hot chocolate). We will certainly be making a return trip to Cannon Beach and Ecola State Park.

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Our trip back to camp for the night was filled with pitstops to visit small beaches, cliffs, and wildlife. Every few miles a new adventure beckoned, and we filled the rest of our day with as many short hikes and vista views as possible. Our original intent was put some miles down and make it further south along the coast, but there was just so much we wanted to see and we couldn’t resist stopping every few minutes. We’re already looking forward to our return trip.

Oregon’s northern coast is magical.

-J&C

Day 2 Portland to the Coast

If you know us you know that we do not live in or near a city by choice. That doesn’t mean that we don’t appreciate the amenities that cities provide. Prior to heading out in Vinny we spent some time in and around Portland availing ourselves of the city’s offerings.

First we had breakfast at J&M Cafe downtown. I tried scrapple, a pork-cornmeal sausage, which was uniquely delicious and Chelsea had two of the biggest pieces of bacon that I have ever seen. This of course was before we experienced the middle of our country and again renewed our vow to eat less meat and possibly move back toward being full-time vegetarians. (More on this in a future post.) The breakfast was wonderful and the service was perfectly Portland.

After breakfast we set up Vinny for what we will call Vinny 1.0 Initial Essentials. (Remember that he will be getting multiple build-out posts in the future) We set up the bed; organized the gear; and secured all of the personal items. The goal of this maiden voyage was to see how we would use the van and try to set up a possible floor plan.

We rounded out the morning at my favorite city spot: REI. Usually these trips are pretty conservative but this time Chelsea told me to get the things that I have been wanting for a while and well, we both went a little nuts. No biggie, it’s our honeymoon right? So we spent money on adventure facilitators that will bring us joy well into our marriage.


As morning quickly turned into noontime we headed to Justin and Valerie’s place for lunch. They moved out here last year from Michigan and were able to give us great insights on Portland and where to go on the coast. They live near Mississippi Avenue so we walked to lunch. As an aside, Mississippi Avenue and their neighborhood are both super cool places and we will certainly be going back to spend some time there. Stormbreaker Brewing has daily BBQ and Mac-n-Cheese specials. You read that right. It doesn’t mean that the day we were there mac was a special, it means that each and every day they have a special mac and a special BBQ: amazing! We shared both and they were quality eats. The beer was pretty dang good too. They offered outside seating under a carport and it rained. In all honesty this is exactly what we wanted from Portland.

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Been there, done that, got the t-shirt.

Justin and Valerie were super hospitable and let us hang around there place for a few hours while we waited for USPS to deliver the remaining outdoor gear but the day was slipping away and we wanted to get to the coast before nightfall so we had to leave before the package arrived. It eventually came and we picked it up on our way back east.

Pointed West we embarked on the adventure part of the Honeymoon. We took 26 (Sunset Highway) out to the Pacific Coast Highway. The van kept up with traffic through the mountains heading out of town without issue.

Portland’s temperate climate provides a great growing environment for many different flora but we were not prepared for the untouched beauty of the old growth forests as we entered the coastal mountain range and Tillamook Forest. We were both taken aback by the dense overhead canopy and its ability to make you enter a world of perpetual dusk even in the middle of the day. It was brilliant which was only made better by the on and off cloudbursts.

The night was quickly approaching but we simply couldn’t head straight to the campsite without seeing some of those famous Oregon sea stacks. Ecola Point, located in Ecola State Park, was nearest to the 26/101 turnoff. We meandered through northern Cannon Beach and took the beautifully paved, yet narrow, road out to the point. Chelsea had been dreaming about Oregon coast views and sea stacks since as long as I can remember. and the look on her face when she finally got to see them in person was truly priceless.

We lingered at Ecola Point until the sun was near to the horizon then we motored south toe Nehalem Bay State Park. This park offered access to the beach, power, delightfully-warm showers and, as you will see in Day 3’s post, surprising wildlife!

Our utensils were packed away in the yet-to-be-delivered supply box awaiting us back in Portland. Luckily we had this giant spoon from our Ikea trip.


This was our first night in the van and sleep came very easily. We were cozy inside as the winds off the Pacific howled outside. Rain was heavy and intermittent throughout the night and the waves could be heard through Vinny’s walls.

Keep reading, we did A LOT on day 3…

-J&C

 

Day 1: MQT > PDX

So let’s start at Day -1: We go married on Saturday October 7, 2017. It rained like crazy so we were forced to get married inside. It was an intimate ceremony with a small group of family and friends at the Ore Dock Brewing Company in Marquette. We wrote our vows; it was a true culmination of the life that we have created together complete with the standard love and trust language but we included fly fishing and homemade pizza. Everyone was dry and able to enjoy the party afterwards.

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Day 1: The Marquette to Chicago flight went off without a hitch. By the time the beverages were distributed we were beginning our descent. Upon landing I was constantly checking my watch and phone and doing calculations and speculations… you see, when I bought the tickets I failed to factor in the human element of travel. We had 36 minutes to deplane and get onboard the flight to Portland. On paper it looks like a no-brainer. Get off grab a coffee and head to the next flight. The second that people found out about the short layover they doubted our ability to make the connection. Well, I am happy to say that we got off the plane quickly thanks to the efficiency of other Midwest passengers. We jogged to the next gate and even had time for a quick bathroom break!

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The flight was beautiful and uneventful. We saw mountains and read.

Portland

We got off the plane, grabbed our luggage and hopped into Bob’s car. Who is Bob and why do I write about him with such familiarity? Well, you see, Bob Kelly is the commercial vehicle salesperson at Northside Auto and Truck. I met Bob over the phone and told him what we were looking to do. Through many emails, texts, and FedEx envelopes Bob and I got to know each other. When he picked us up he told us about PNW history, the Oregon Trail, and Portland’s growing homeless situation.

IMG_0448He was very nicebut I had a one-track mind at thatpoint.We got to his office and chatted while the new member of our little family was getting its bath.

 

 

 

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Here he is: Vincent Van Go! Giddyup!!!

He’s a 2017 Ford Transit 250 with 148′ wheelbase and the midroof. He was big an empty, a true blank canvas. We will be dedicating large portions of the blog to him in the future but suffice it to say this is our new adventure rig. Total van life would not really be dirtbag yuppie. Let’s call our personal philosophy VanLite. More on that later too.

With our empty van we headed to suburban sprawl to pick up some light trappings for our return trip. IKEA and Target served as our fist stock-up site. Although it’s all in a pile in the back of the van we have the basic necessities now!

Due to the fact that we didn’t have time to lunch or breakfast after unloading our carts we crawled back into IKEA and devoured the, “most delicious hotdog” of Chelsea’s life.

We bunked at the Jupiter Hotel. It’s a groovy reboot of a 1960’s hotel. Check it out. I suggest the “mild side.”IMG_0485

Dinner at Burnside Brewing brought my first real taste of a fresh PNW IPA. I had the Isomer and was not disappointed. Bottled stuff is pretty good but fresh from the tap simply cannot be beat.

Today, we leave the city.

Hopefully by tomorrow we will be used to the time difference.

 

Superior Air

If you haven’t heard, Michigan’s Upper Peninsula is a mountain bike lover’s dream. Many major cycling publications have sent teams of riders to report back to the rest of the world on our riding. (For reference check out: Da Yoopers and PinkBike). World-class trail systems can be found in Houghton, Copper Harbor, Ishpeming and Marquette. The towns have apparently come to the realization that cycling tourism is a real thing. The rich natural resources of the UP are ideal for mountain bike trails.

Munising, home of the world famous Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore, is in the process of putting some serious singletrack in place. As part of their new trail the Munising Bay Trail Network decided to create a skills loop and a jump line. I first heard about the jump line through instagram. I follow Landowski Trailworx, LLC and they started posting some beautiful berms, jumps, bridges, and rock gardens. I saw that they were geotagging some of their feed in Munising. The trail looked like it had some solid lines.IMG_2954

Last weekend I invited Tim up to Basecamp and we loaded up the full squish bikes and headed East. We stopped at Hillside Party Store for snacks then unloaded in the gravel parking lot.

Initially we started climbing on a super nice crushed gravel pathway but soon found out that this trail was under construction. As best as I can tell this was the new connector to the Trust Fund Trail.

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We started over and climbed the gravel road to the start of the current singletrack loop. The short climb is not fun at all, but it gets the blood flowing and builds stoke. We entered the trail at the end of the jump line.

From the bottom of the line you get a great perspective of the run. Looking up you see several deep berms, tabletops for days, and a sweet arched roller bridge.

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The roller bridge.

We lugged to the top and we were drooling the whole way up. There are two routes up: the quickest is a shortcut to the top; the other a longer scenic route. We opted for the shortcut most of the time. At the top of the line you get a sense of why its called “Superior Air.”IMG_3082

The Superior Air line is a blast. The current line starts out slow with a few rollers but quickly builds with tabletops that increase in size after the first two berms.  I was able to really let loose after the first lap and then it was on.

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Airing it out mid run.

There is a little something for everyone on Superior Air. Every tabletop can be rolled and the final double is very easy to manual over or roll. Honestly though, this trail was made to be railed.

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Coming in hot from a deep berm.

Munising is getting rad. I’ve heard good things about the Valley Spur singletrack. Hopefully that gets expanded soon. I would like to see a loop there.

The pace of Superior Air is great to safely learn how to hit small to medium size dirt jumps in a gravity setting. I am following Landowski and Munising Bay Trail Network anxiously awaiting the opening of the next phase. It has some nice looking roll-ins, rock gardens, and gaps. I am pumped!

On the way out of town the smell of pasties wafted through the car. We had an afternoon of riding planned in MQT so we opted out of the hefty hand pies, for now. We’ll be back.

-J

The Sacred Sticker Pile

Admit it, somewhere in your house you have one. A stack of stickers that you have been carefully curating over the years. Every race/ festival/ local shop/ and brewery that has had the pleasure of your attendance is represented.

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In the outdoor activity realm stickers are like little vinyl flags that are flown to alert others to our own personal tribe. We put them on our car windows, bikes, home climbing walls, rooftop boxes, and beer fridges. They signal a safe space where other like-minded people gather to do the things that make them feel alive. I always get nervous when I see a vehicle without stickers. Whenever I pull up to a trailhead and I see a clean rig with no stickers I automatically think there is a serial killer waiting for me in the woods.

In short, stickers show the world that you are more than a job title and a bank account. They help others to answer the question, “what do you do?” Because of this we are very picky with which stickers we display. This is where the pile comes in. “I mean, I really like __________, but what if___________.” You hem and you haw about what others will think about your apparent undying love for Company X or Local Race 2017. But at some point you have to make a decision. It’s certainly hard. Some stickers are only made for certain events or product lines and YOU MAY NEVER COME ACROSS ONE THAT SPEAKS TO YOU AND WHO YOU ARE THAT PERFECTLY AGAIN! I totally get that feeling. I used to have a clean car and a massive pile of stickers.

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I suffered from SAD (Sticker Anxiety Disorder). You know how I got past that? I came to the logical realization there will always be more stickers. My current collection is proof of this concept. Whenever one fades or is lost at highway speed another will come along that may even better represent who you are. You probably already have a perfect replacement lined up on the bench. There it is, behind that regionally specific sticker that only people in the know will get.

-J

Bike. Tenkara. Bike.

Flyfishing and bike riding are two of my passions. They also have the capacity to be two of the most technical and confusing hobbies. I get it; I have a garage of bikes each with its own unique function. I also have many different rod, reel, and line combinations each for different species, water conditions, and times of year.

Sometimes you just have to shed all of those choices and complexity. Yesterday, rather than loading up my car with a few rods, multiple fly boxes, and driving out to any river of my choosing no matter the distance I chose instead to simplify the process. So I strapped my tenkara and its tube to the downtube of my Stache and started pedaling.

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I’ve taken rods on the bike before but I have always had to strap them to a pack because of their length and the fact that the reel is usually attached. However the telescoping feature of the tenkara rod makes zip-tying it to the bike simple and effective. I just made sure that I could unscrew the cap without snipping the ties. The tube hangs below the bottom bracket a little more than I wanted it to but as with most home remedies the function outweighed the form in this case.

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Here’s how it goes: get to the river under your own steam, shed the helmet, flip the bike, remove the rod, attache the tippet, and get in the water. Super simple. No time wasted finding a suitable spot to stash the car or picking the right rod. Just get to it.

This first trip was an experiment. Trying new things is always a little difficult for me for me and I was especially unsure about my rod attachment method. But it appeared to have held nicely and the rod went together without a hitch. Luckily finding fishable water is not a problem in our area and in 11 miles I was in the middle of a great trout stream without a soul in sight.

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A few casts in I found a taker.

Earning things always feels better than having them handed to you. This was definitely an experience that was earned. I got to the river under my own power and used a very limiting technique which relies only on water reading and fly placement. It was beautiful, satisfying, and restorative.

Get out there, try something new, and squeeze more adventure out of your everyday.

-J


This is not a sponsored post. Learn more the tenkara method here. Check out this post for more Stache action.

Spring Ramblin’

The snow has totally melted but the trails are not quite fully dried up yet. That means that I’ve gotta get my two-wheeled fix elsewhere. I have been spinning around on dirt roads, snowmobile trails and backroads, like I like to do this time of year. One of the great things about the UP is that you can leave the main road and tear off down a dirt road and be in the middle of nowhere fast. Sometimes I methodically plan my route via google earth. Other times I prefer to just go wherever the wind blows me. Lately, I have been leaving from my house and just ticking off miles close to home. Rambling and rolling through the unimproved roads of central Marquette County.

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Pounding these lesser-traveled roads in the spring is a great way to build base miles and fitness. It’s also a great place to be alone with your thoughts. You can do a lot of learning and growing on a bike in the backwoods. There are just some lessons that cannot be learned anywhere else.

I especially enjoy threading the needle through pockmarked sections like this. The rush is easily snuffed out when you make a miscalculation. I cannot wait for the road commission to come through and grade all of our dirt roads. Freshly graded dirt is better than any pavement.

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The Stache performs quite well in its new duties. While I will definitely still take it on trails once in a while it will not be seeing the same amount of trail action this season… full squish bike is on its way. My goal for the Stache is to make it a little more comfortable to ride over long distances and maybe even some bike backing. I am sooooo excited to start looking for bike bags and gear! I think that the first order of business is going to be some less aggressive rubberz. What a year we have ahead of us. I think that it will be a nice companion for the Safari that Chels will be piloting.

Backroads are like beautiful byways for bicycles. Unfortunately, the ditches are littered with garbage. Luckily for me, I live in Michigan and they are each worth a dime. In law school I would ride the gravel in Washtenaw County picking up cans in order to buy groceries. Now that I have a big boy job I have gone back to my roots and am picking up cans again. However, now I get use the can money for fun stuff. (Chelsea and I are planning something crazy cool and the can money is going to support that chapter… stay tuned) I am working on getting a “Can Counter” on the sidebar to keep track of the cans collected & deposits earned. These rides are like going to a gym that pays you to workout. I get to help nature and stash some cash at the same time.

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The Stache is in a period of transition right now so forgive the silly bent bars. The new upright position really suits this bike’s new purpose: exploration. (More on its replacement soon.)

The bent bars and slight riser stem have really transformed the Stache into a comfortable mile munching machine. (Alliteration is fun!). I am currently using the On-One Mary bars. The Jones Loop bar is definitely in the future once I figure out whether or not I like bike backing.

I cannot wait for the full-sus to show up but until then I will be building up and putting miles on the Stache.

Keep on ramblin’.

-J